Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss


Learning about hearing loss can seem daunting. The more you know about how hearing loss occurs, however, the more able you will be to treat it. Spending time familiarizing yourself with the signs and symptoms of hearing loss will enhance your ability to assess your hearing needs and to pursue a path of treatment that will make your day-to-day life much more comfortable.



Learning about hearing loss can seem daunting. The more you know about how hearing loss occurs, however, the more able you will be to treat it. Spending time familiarizing yourself with the signs and symptoms of hearing loss will enhance your ability to assess your hearing needs and to pursue a path of treatment that will make your day-to-day life much more comfortable.



What Is Hearing Loss?

There are generally three types of hearing loss, and they occur for different reasons. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the tiny hair cells in the inner ear become damaged. This can occur in older people, but also for people who have been exposed for a high level of noise for a prolonged period of time.

Many people experience conductive hearing loss. This occurs when there is a blockage between the outer ear, the middle ear, and/or the middle ear. When this happens, sound waves cannot effectively travel, and louder sounds become muffled and softer sounds can be imperceptible altogether.

Mixed hearing loss occurs when there are problems conducting sound to the inner ear, but when the inner ear’s hair cells are also damaged. It is “mixed” because it is a combination of conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

Sometimes the brain has difficulty processing the very information contained in sound: where sounds are coming from, distinguishing one sound from the next, or making sense of how sounds are ordered (such as finding it hard to block out background noise to understand a conversation). This type of hearing loss can be broadly categorized as an auditory processing disorder.



What Is Hearing Loss?

There are generally three types of hearing loss, and they occur for different reasons. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the tiny hair cells in the inner ear become damaged. This can occur in older people, but also for people who have been exposed for a high level of noise for a prolonged period of time.

Many people experience conductive hearing loss. This occurs when there is a blockage between the outer ear, the middle ear, and/or the middle ear. When this happens, sound waves cannot effectively travel, and louder sounds become muffled and softer sounds can be imperceptible altogether.

Mixed hearing loss occurs when there are problems conducting sound to the inner ear, but when the inner ear’s hair cells are also damaged. It is “mixed” because it is a combination of conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

Sometimes the brain has difficulty processing the very information contained in sound: where sounds are coming from, distinguishing one sound from the next, or making sense of how sounds are ordered (such as finding it hard to block out background noise to understand a conversation). This type of hearing loss can be broadly categorized as an auditory processing disorder.



Factors Contributing to Hearing Loss

There are many biological factors that can contribute to hearing loss. The number one factor in hearing loss is simply aging. There are also environmental factors to hearing loss, though. Hearing loss can result from the loud noises we hear every day in the space we live in, work at, and visit. Hearing loss can also result from sudden and temporary loud noises, such as when gunfire or explosions go off, and from persistent noises that emanate from factory machinery and large equipment. You can even experience hearing loss after being surrounded by loud music taken in at live concerts and in clubs—even if only for one night. There are other, everyday ways in which (temporary) hearing loss can occur. This includes a buildup of earwax, or from changes in air pressure that occur when flying, or participating in underwater activities.



Factors Contributing to Hearing Loss

There are many biological factors that can contribute to hearing loss. The number one factor in hearing loss is simply aging. There are also environmental factors to hearing loss, though. Hearing loss can result from the loud noises we hear every day in the space we live in, work at, and visit. Hearing loss can also result from sudden and temporary loud noises, such as when gunfire or explosions go off, and from persistent noises that emanate from factory machinery and large equipment. You can even experience hearing loss after being surrounded by loud music taken in at live concerts and in clubs—even if only for one night. There are other, everyday ways in which (temporary) hearing loss can occur. This includes a buildup of earwax, or from changes in air pressure that occur when flying, or participating in underwater activities.



Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

Hearing loss cannot be reversed but if you make some simple and small shifts in your hearing habits you can improve your overall physical and mental health. The first step in treating hearing loss is to visit a hearing health professional who can assess whether or not you need a hearing aid, and who can assist in selecting a model that works best for you. You can also practice healthy hearing habits by switching to headphones that fit over your ears rather than inside of your ear canals, and by simply covering your ears when faced with loud sounds such as passing sirens. No matter how you treat your hearing health, the effects on the rest of your life can be immense.

Treating hearing loss can help you to recognize and appropriately respond to speech, which can not only help you communicate with your loved ones but can increase your earning power. Hearing Loss Association of America reports, “While people in the workplace with the mildest hearing losses show little or no drop in income compared to their normal hearing peers, as the hearing loss increases, so does the reduction in compensation.”
It is really important to treat hearing loss in order to improve your safety. There is a greater risk of falling and suffering from accidents when you leave your hearing loss untreated. The better you hear, the more attuned you are to your surroundings.

The emotional benefits of treating your hearing loss are immense. Hearing loss can make you feel like you are disconnected from the world around you, which can lead to feelings of isolation, depression, and anxiety. Treating your hearing loss will not only improve your abilities to hear your friends, loved ones, and coworkers, of course, but will also help you to feel emotionally connected and supported more generally.



Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

Hearing loss cannot be reversed but if you make some simple and small shifts in your hearing habits you can improve your overall physical and mental health. The first step in treating hearing loss is to visit a hearing health professional who can assess whether or not you need a hearing aid, and who can assist in selecting a model that works best for you. You can also practice healthy hearing habits by switching to headphones that fit over your ears rather than inside of your ear canals, and by simply covering your ears when faced with loud sounds such as passing sirens. No matter how you treat your hearing health, the effects on the rest of your life can be immense.

Treating hearing loss can help you to recognize and appropriately respond to speech, which can not only help you communicate with your loved ones but can increase your earning power. Hearing Loss Association of America reports, “While people in the workplace with the mildest hearing losses show little or no drop in income compared to their normal hearing peers, as the hearing loss increases, so does the reduction in compensation.”
It is really important to treat hearing loss in order to improve your safety. There is a greater risk of falling and suffering from accidents when you leave your hearing loss untreated. The better you hear, the more attuned you are to your surroundings.

The emotional benefits of treating your hearing loss are immense. Hearing loss can make you feel like you are disconnected from the world around you, which can lead to feelings of isolation, depression, and anxiety. Treating your hearing loss will not only improve your abilities to hear your friends, loved ones, and coworkers, of course, but will also help you to feel emotionally connected and supported more generally.



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